Archive for February, 2017

In lieu of snow

I’m still waiting for snow. We haven’t had any yet, just one very minor less-than-even-a-dusting, back in. . . maybe it was December? Anyway, I do feel cheated in that regard, but I had a wonderful surprise this morning when I leaned over the bridge while stretching my calves. It looked like a very small leaf lazily drifting toward the bridge, but no! It was actually the teeniest, tiny, adorable TURTLE! He couldn’t have been any bigger than a silver dollar, and while I watched his miniature little legs slowly steering him along, another turtle came into sight, this one brown and of a nice respectable medium size. Now, I am definitely NOT ready for the warm weather that usually brings the turtles back, but if it’s not going to snow, there’s just no reason at all for it to be cold, cloudy, and dreary. We might as well enjoy spring! (Although who ever heard of sunny 70s day after day in February?!?)

Stay tuned. Next week, I plan to plant tomato seeds in Jessica’s room.

Hooded Mergansers. . . times four!!!

On this morning’s walk at 8:30, later than usual because I treated myself to a refreshing Saturday morning sleep-in, two pairs of hooded mergansers were swimming around just upstream of the bridge! What a treat! They stayed in the area, although sometimes quite a distance away, for a full forty minutes. Here’s a picture from the Missouri Department of Conservation’s website, and yes, they looked just like this:

hooded_merganser_pair_crest_raised_2-24-15 That website also gave the following information:

“Hooded Merganser, Lophodytes cucullatus

“Family: Anatidae (ducks, geese, swans) in the order Anseriformes

“Adult male has black head, neck, and back; the black-margined white crest and chestnut flanks of the male are very distinct. Female is brown with a rust-colored crest. The bill is slim, serrated, with a hooked tip; bill is dark in male and bicolored in female. Male gives a low, froglike sound; female a hoarse “gak.” Mergansers are divers, and the legs are far back on the body; on land, the posture is upright. The head crest may be raised to a nearly circular shape or lowered so that it trails behind the head. Hooded mergansers can leap straight out of the water and is our only merganser that can do so. Hooded mergansers have crests that trail behind the head or can be raised to create a circular shape.”

Here’s another picture from that website, but the two males I saw both had their crests raised the whole time. Very impressive and just ducky!

hooded_merganser_pair_2-24-15

Jeopardy Question: What is 3.2?

Answer: the number of minutes it takes to comb bind one Pressing Toward the Mark workbook.

A more telling number is probably 16.5, which is the number of hours it takes to comb bind 300 such workbooks. I was really glad to be able to do it, and having the task finished does give me a great sense of satisfaction, but I am pretty sure I would also be fine to never again in my natural life stand for that long at the dining room table pulling, adding front and back covers, cross-stacking, adding plastic covers, punching (six punches per book), and threading (two stacks per book) any PTMs.

It is also clear that my project planning skills are simply not up to snuff. On editing, I never plan nearly enough time, and on this project, I roughly estimated it would take 25 hours. I’m obviously way off – still – but at least this time it’s in the right direction. I always like to exceed expectations.